The big thing about seeing small

Biology and telecom have more in common than we think. Dodi, Conor, and their guests draw parallels between seeing inside a cell and computing in the telecom industry. Learn what that could mean for our future.

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The discovery of protein A

Is it possible to love one protein? Dodi and Conor learn that it is, in the special case of a protein that’s integral in purifying many of today’s biologic drugs.

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Quantum biology: going subatomic

How do birds know where to go in the winter? And why are plants so efficient at making food? Dodi and Conor chat with researchers studying whether quantum biology might come into play.

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How does your brain discover what it wants

Have you every felt terror in the grocery store, dodging the marketing blitz to find what you need? If so, you might relate to this podcast guest who’s also a neuro economist.

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The artistry of vaccine development

Dodi and Conor chat with a scientist who fulfilled her childhood dreams, a professor with a passion for vaccine design, and a medical doctor turned pharmacovigilante. Tune in to learn what the heck that is and how vaccine development is like ballet.

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Spinning out: from bench to biotech company

In this episode, Dodi and Conor chat about what it takes to spin a good idea into a successful biotech business. Interviews with an innovator and two people who help technology like his get off the ground.

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Making sense of antisense oligo therapy

In this episode Conor tells Dodi about 4-year-old Roy Muhrbeck who was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Learn how an oligonucleotide (oligo) therapy helps Roy and where he is today. Ionis Pharmaceuticals’ Max Moore explains the science.

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Scratched knees, smelly yogurt, and speedy wound healing

So, what does yogurt have to do with wound healing? In this episode, Evelina Vågesjö from Ilya Pharma helps Conor and Dodi see the connection. It’s all about getting help from our small bacterial friends, lactic acid, and chemokines. Tune in to learn how it all connects.

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School’s never out: Educating the next gen biopharma talents

Education matters for sure. But what is special about biopharmaceutical education? And what does the future hold? Dodi and Conor are about to find out. Their guides in this episode are Killian O’Driscoll at NIBRT, Ireland, and Ron Kander at Thomas Jefferson University, US.

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Fighting fake news in biotechnology: Sense about Science

Can you trust the scientific claims on products you buy? Conor's curiosity led him down a three-pronged investigation about what you can and should believe when it comes to science statistics and statements. His journey starts with Alex Clegg from the Sense about Science Ask for Evidence campaign.

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Learning about blockchain in healthcare

Blockchain is everywhere. But what is it, really? And what can the blockchain technology bring to healthcare? Dodi and Conor unravel these questions together with Dr. Cathy Mulligan at Imperial College London in this week’s podcast episode.

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Innovation: exploring cyborgs, jugaad, and inside-the-box thinking

Follow Dodi as she dives into the world of innovation. More specifically, the difference between talking innovation and being innovative. Meet Tobias the cyborg that likes thinking inside the box and learn what Goud has to say about the concept of jugaad in India.

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Microbiome transplant: cooties can cure you

Conor has what he calls "microbiomania". Whatever the topic, he can bring it back to microbiomes in about three sentences. So, imagine his excitement when he got to meet up with two fellow microbiome enthusiasts, Colleen Cutcliffe, CEO of Pendulum and Jacques Ravel, professor at University of Maryland.

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The Framingham Heart Study

During a lively lunch chat about the popularity of wearable fitness trackers, the curious question came up: where would healthcare be now if we’d been able to generate all this data 50 to 70 years ago? Dodi directly thought of the world’s longest running human study, the Framingham Heart Study, which is still ongoing after 70 years.

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CAR T cell therapy: how it helped 2 brave young women fight cancer

This is a serious but inspirational story where a few brave souls blazed the trail and are now paying it forward. This is the story of Emily Whitehead, the first CAR T pediatric patient. And this is the story of Nicole Gularte, the leukemia patient who received CAR T cell therapy three times! Support the Emily Whitehead Foundation and Nicole by donating here.

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A map of humankind from the inside out—the Human Protein Atlas

We humans have been mapping things since the beginning of time. In this episode, Dodi takes Conor on an explorer’s journey. Their destination? The Human Protein Atlas project. Strap on your seatbelt—it’s a bumpy ride connecting the dots between explorers, chemists, geneticists…and even sociologists.

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Bonus episode: The role of AI in healthcare, more specifically pandemics

A pandemic can start with a picnic. But can we prevent pandemics without cancelling feel-good gatherings? Enter artificial intelligence (AI) into the world of healthcare and life sciences. Dodi meets up with an AI expert panel and gets examples of the real potential of this very trendy topic.

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A kidney surgeon who fixes the plumbing

The list of people needing kidney transplants is tragically long, and donor lists are desperately short. Conor and Dodi find scientists who are coming up with alternative solutions to this problem. Some enable transplantation of less-than-perfect organs, and others dream of 3D printing important organs.

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How a Chinese hamster came to dominate production of biopharmaceuticals

Little did you know, but a single hamster has been a force of innovation and massive biomedical production. Scientists devote entire careers to so called CHO cells from this Chinese hamster’s ovary. Dodi and Conor talk with a couple of those scientists to figure out why this hamster rules the biopharma world.

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How the hunt for a new way to make jam changed the way we make medicines

Dodi and Conor discover how jam played a part in paving the way for biopharmaceutical drugs. Sixty years ago, Swedish scientists happened upon a new method of protein separation through chromatography. The very same technique continues to be the foundation for modern biomedical manufacturing.

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Trailer: Discovery matters…because it does!

Ever wondered what jam and hamsters have done for medical science? Or if there are 3D-printed kidneys? Prepare for mind-boggling discussions on scientific discoveries as two curious minds, Conor McKechnie and Dodi Axelson, chat with scientists, historians, and experts in the field of life sciences.